Blog

News This Week: Kosta Browne Sale and Wildfire Lawsuit

Posted on July 20, 2018 by Estate Vineyard

EACH WEEK WE COLLECT TOP LOCAL NEWS AND RECENT REAL ESTATE STORIES HOT OFF THE PRESS FOR YOUR WEEKEND CLICKING PLEASURE.

Kosta Browne Sold
Duckhorn Wine Company purchased Sebastopol’s Kosta Browne Winery. The deal includes a tasting room in the Barlow, 170 acres of vineyards and inventory. READ MORE

Wine Storage for Everybody
Looking for better ways to store the wines you love? Here are some great ideas for how to create wine storage for a variety of homes. READ MORE

July Gardening Tips
Discover top tips for gardening in July―the perfect time to put in some extra work to keep gardens looking great for months to come. READ MORE

Santa Rosa Sues PG&E
The City of Santa Rosa is suing PG&E for financial damages caused by last year’s October wildfires. READ MORE

*Feature image courtesy of gardenista.com

BALO: INCREDIBLE WINE TASTING AND GREAT FOR BOCCE

Posted on July 16, 2018 by Estate Vineyard

Article courtesy of SF Chronicle:

We are thrilled to see our listing, Balo Winery & Estate, featured in the SF Chronicle.

Balo could be a quick stop on your Anderson Valley itinerary, if you’re in a rush: Tastings are free, and are usually limited to about four wines. On the other hand, if you want to linger, Balo could be your entire afternoon. You could buy a bottle, order a plate of charcuterie and cheese and relax on one of the outdoor picnic tables, followed by a game of bocce.

The winery was founded in 2009, though vines had been planted here about 10 years earlier. Jason Drew, one of Mendocino County’s top winemakers, made the first five vintages of Balo wines. The winemaking remains solid focusing on Pinot Noir and aromatic white wines. If you’re feeling peckish but don’t want to order an entire block of cheese or roll of cured meat from Balo’s deli menu, don’t fret: Complimentary cheese and salami are always laid out at the tasting bar.


WHAT TO TRY: Balo does produce a rosé of Pinot Noir ($24), but more interesting is its blanc de noir-style Pinot ($32), a red wine presenting as a white. The grapes are taken off of their skin almost immediately after picking, so that they absorb almost no color. It’s a floral, fresh, bright wine, a nice alternative to a rosé. You’ll likely also taste a couple vintages of Pinot Noir ($38 to $45), which are balanced, quiet examples of the grape.

View the Balo Winery and Estate Listing: CLICK HERE

 

News This Week: Real Estate Technology & Homesteading Inspiration

Posted on July 13, 2018 by Estate Vineyard

EACH WEEK WE COLLECT TOP LOCAL NEWS AND RECENT REAL ESTATE STORIES HOT OFF THE PRESS FOR YOUR WEEKEND CLICKING PLEASURE.

Technology and Sustainability
Discover how technology is helping to create more sustainable homes, and why it matters. “By ensuring that their home will be smart and sustainable, both from an ecological as well as an economic perspective, all parties are set up for success.” READ MORE

New Software Means More Homes
The permitting process for new development may be getting faster thanks to the San Ramon based company Accela. By moving the permitting process online, they seek to have the “permit process go from multiple months to two weeks.” READ MORE

Sonoma County to Get Help Detecting Wildfires
The Board of Supervisors is expected to approve a plan to install high definition cameras on local peaks to provide early detection of wildfires. Similar systems around Lake Tahoe and San Diego are already in place. READ MORE

Making Homestead Dreams a Reality
A homestead style farm provides both bounty and beauty, plus the opportunity to “grow the garden of your dreams.” READ MORE

 

*Featured image courtesy of sunset.com

Keefer Ranch: Highly Acclaimed Vineyard is on the Market for the First Time

Posted on July 11, 2018 by Estate Vineyard

KEEFER RANCH

Highly Acclaimed Vineyard in Russian River AVA Sub-Appellation
24.92± Acres on 2 Parcels: 13.47± Acres Planted in Vineyard with a Spacious Estate Home

We are thrilled to announce that this highly acclaimed vineyard is on the market for the first time. This is a rare opportunity to acquire this well respected, top performing vineyard in Green Valley Sub-Appellation of the Russian River AVA in Sebastopol. Famous for its high quality Pinot Noir and Chardonnay grapes, the Keefer Ranch vineyard is a top-producing, mature, professionally managed operation with fruit going into key designated wine programs. This offering includes 2 parcels, one of which can be lot-line adjusted for resale of the home only, which is 4149+/- sqft. with 3Bed/2.5Bath and includes frontage to Green Valley Creek. There is a creek-side apple orchard included in the sale.

Property Details:

Parcels: Keefer Ranch includes two, contiguous legal parcels of APN 105-050-027 of 17.77± acres and APN 104-050-029 of 7.15± acres
Acreage: 24.92± acres
Vineyards: 13.47± net acres of vineyard (76% Pinot Noir, 24% Chardonnay), and 11.45± acres of site and support land including the estate home area, riparian area along Green Valley Creek, property access and vineyard service roads, an irrigation reservoir, and a small apple orchard along the creek.
Residence: The larger westerly parcel includes the 4,149± SF Estate home, with 3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths
Additional Buildings: 3-car garage, plus several support structures (pump houses, equipment and general storage buildings)

VIEW THE LISTING: CLICK HERE

Insider Tips: Flawless Landscaping Features

Posted on July 10, 2018 by Estate Vineyard

Discover our top five simple and easy landscaping tips for creating outdoor spaces that are inviting, beautiful and easy to maintain.

Path leading to backyard permeable patio with firepit and chairs with well mulched California native plants, Heath-Delaney garden

1. Plant Natives
Using native plants in your landscaping will reduce water usage and make maintenance easier. Plus native plants will attract beneficial insects, and provide habitat for birds and other wildlife. Select species that will provide year-round appeal―diverse plants that bloom at different times, or shrubs and trees that have interesting bark in the winter. There are great resources for choosing the natives that will do best in your yard. Check out calscape.org for inspiration.

2. Use Light
Whether you are adding simple solar lights or investing in a low voltage light system, adding lights to your landscaping will make your outdoor spaces ideal for evening gatherings and nighttime festivities. Start with lighting pathways and other hardscaped areas like patios and decks. Mini spotlights can be used to highlight certain features such as fountains or specimen trees. Use a selection of multiple dim lights (rather than fewer bright lights) to give your yard a magical glow.

3. Add Seating
Create spots to rest and enjoy your outdoor space. Outdoor living spaces can be used like a living or dining room―though a simple bench or chair in amongst the flowers can be a fantastic feature for all to enjoy.

4. Make a Water Feature
The sound of water is relaxing, and can make you feel cooler on hot days. Larger water features can also provide additional habitat for water plants and bird life.

5. Use Potted Plants
Outdoor planters add variety and interest throughout the year. Add splashes of color with bright patterns and textures to your pots and planter boxes. Potted plants can soften hardscapes like patio edges or concrete steps, creating a more lush and alive feel.

 

*Featured image from www.julieorrdesign.com
*Article image from Saxon Holt/PhotoBotanic

Veraison, Smoke Taint & Napa Vineyards

Posted on July 04, 2018 by Estate Vineyard

© Daily Republic | The fire started in Yolo County and is already bigger than the Tubbs fire that ripped through Napa and Sonoma last year.

As most of you know, Napa is on fire.  Again.  And those in the “know” in regards to wine are busy postulating on the effects of smoke taint as it relates to “veraison.”  Is smoke taint becoming a thing with wine? Too early to tell and certainly interesting speculation for wine conversation.

Meanwhile, what is the meaning of the cryptic term “veraison?”  Veraison is defined this way:  “In viticulture (grape-growing), veraison is the onset of ripening. The term is originally French (véraison / veʀɛzɔ̃), but has been adopted into English use.” (Wikipedia).  Veraison has everything to do with the permeability of the grape skin.  Less ripened grapes have thicker skins, which suggests they are less susceptible to smoke taint.  That’s where we are right now, in the early part of the grape ripening season, so most likely smoke taint will not be a factor for the current fire.

Here’s more about the current fire affecting Napa County, courtesy of W. Blake Gray | Posted Tuesday, 03-Jul-2018:

Growers are keeping an anxious eye on two large fires in Wine Country

A huge wildfire has crossed over into Napa County, less than a year after the region was devastated by one of the worst fire outbreaks in northern California history.

The air was brown in San Francisco, about 60 miles south of Napa County, on Sunday morning from smoke from two Wine Country fires: the County Fire, which started in Yolo County east of Napa, and the Pawnee Fire in Lake County north of Napa.

The County Fire is growing like Godzilla: 60,000 acres as of Monday evening, with only 5 percent contained. It is already larger than the Tubbs Fire that last year devastated northern Napa Valley and neighboring Sonoma County, and it is growing at a faster rate – 33 percent on Monday alone. Cal Fire believes it started in dry vegetation; the cause is under investigation.

However, some of the news on the County Fire is so far, so good (cross fingers). CalFire says it threatens 700 structures – six times as many as 12 hours earlier – but so far has not destroyed any. At this point, no wineries are believed threatened, and we learned last year that vineyards are effective natural firebreaks.

“I’ve looked at the map many times here. It’s not anywhere in our grapegrowing vicinity,” Heidi Soldinger, marketing and communications manager for Napa Valley Grapegrowers, told Wine-Searcher. “At this time, we’re feeling like we’re pretty safe. But after what we experienced in October, I’m not going to make any predictions.”

For wineries, smoke taint is almost as big a concern as the fire itself. California wineries have had great interest in smoke taint research since last year’s wildfires.

Napa’s grapes have not yet gone through the process of veraison, where white grapes turn black, so they are less vulnerable to smoke taint than they will be soon. But that doesn’t exempt them from risk. In 2008, Anderson Valley Pinot Noir grapes were heavily smoke tainted by fires that occurred pre-veraison in June.

“We do not currently know exactly how much fresh smoke is needed for a real risk of smoke taint development in the wine,” Anita Oberholster, assistant cooperative extension specialist for UC Davis Department of Viticulture and Enology, told Wine-Searcher. “However, we do know that pre-veraison it will take more fresh smoke and longer exposure times for smoke taint risk compared to post-veraison grapes. The less ripe the grapes, the smaller the risk. Green hard berries have low risk whereas larger, softer, green berries have medium risk, with post-veraison grapes having the highest risk.”

Fortunately, though the County Fire has leapt into Napa County, it is still north and east of Napa Valley, and the wind in Napa County tends to blow from the ocean (west) to east. Winds can change, and fires can leap, but for now it’s a worry for wineries more than a threat.

To the north of Napa, however, the Pawnee Fire has already destroyed 22 structures in Lake County. It’s only one-third the size of the County Fire, and it was 75 percent contained as of Monday morning. The cause of this fire is also under investigation.

It’s possible this fire might have more impact on 2018 Napa Cabernets than the County Fire, because much of the Cabernet Sauvignon grown in Lake County finds its way into Napa Valley bottlings. A wine labeled as “Napa Valley”, or any other AVA, must contain at least 85 percent grapes from that AVA. Lake County Cabernet grapes fetched an average of $2500 per ton last year; for Napa County Cabernet, the average was $7500 per ton. It’s also possible that the great majority of Lake County grapes won’t be affected at all.

California usually has dry summers – that’s why the wine is so good – and is thus vulnerable to fires. This season they seem to be early. The state had below-average rainfall again last winter after a rainy winter in 2016-17 ended a five-year drought. But rain might not matter: in 2017, after that wet winter, more than 500,000 acres burned in California, more than double the destruction of dry 2016.

Wednesday July 4 is the biggest fireworks day of the year in the US. Not, however, after last year in wine country.

“In Napa County we’re not having any fireworks this year,” Soldinger said. “Everyone is very aware. Our thoughts go out to everyone in Yolo and Lake County. We know how that feels.”